Artificial Intelligence, Legal philosophy, Man / Machine, The man / machine series

Digital legal persons? Fragments (Man / Machine XI and Identity / Privacy III)

The following are notes ahead of a panel discussion this afternoon, where we will discuss the need for a legal structure for digital persons in the wake of the general discussion of artificial intelligence.  The idea of a digital assistant seems to suggest a world in which we will see new legal actors. These actors will buy, order, negotiate and represent us in different ways, and so will have a massive impact on the emerging legal landscape. How do we approach this in the best possible way? One strawman suggestion would be to propose a new legal construct in addition to natural and legal persons, people and companies, and introduce a new legal category for digital persons. The construct could be used to answer questions like: What actions can a digital person perform on behalf of another person and how is this defined in a structured way? How is the responsibility of the digital person divided of the 4 Aristotelian causes? Hardware error, software error, coder error and objective error all seem to suggest different responsible actors behind the digital person. Hardware manufacturers would be responsible for malfunction there, software producers for errors in software and coders for error that could not be seen as falling within the scope of the software companies — finally the one asking for the assistant to perform a task would have a responsibility for a clearly defined task and objective. In n-person interactions between digital persons with complex failures, who is then responsible? Is there a…

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Artificial Intelligence, Man / Machine, The man / machine series

The free will to make slightly worse choices ( Man / Machine XI)

In his chapter on intelectronics, his word for what most closely resembles artificial intelligence, Stanislaw Lem suggests an insidious way in which the machine could take over. It would not be, he says, because it wants to terrorize us, but more likely because it will try to be helpful. Lem develops the idea of the control problem, and the optimization problem, decades before they are then re-discovered by Nick Bostrom and others, and he runs through the many different ways in which a benevolent machine may just manipulate us in order to get better results for us. This, however, is not the worst scenario. At the very end of the chapter, Lem suggests something much more interesting, and – frankly – hilarious. He says that another, more credible, version of the machines taking over would look like this: we develop machines that are simply better at making decisions for us than we would be making these very same decisions ourselves. A simple example: your personal assistant can help you book travel, and knowing your preferences, being able to weight them against those of the rest of the family, the assistant has always booked top-notch vacations for you. Now, you crave your personal freedom so you book it yourself, and naturally – since you lack the combinatorial intelligence of an AI – the result is worse. You did not enjoy it as much, and the restaurants were not as spot on as they usually are. The book stores you found were…

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Artificial Intelligence, Man / Machine, Technology, The man / machine series

Stanislaw Lem, Herbert Simon and artificial intelligence as broad social technology project (Man / Machine X)

Why do we develop artificial intelligence? Is it merely because of an almost faustian curiosity? Is it because of an innate megalomania that suggests that we could, if we want to, become gods? The debate today is ripe with examples of risks and dangers, but the argument for the development of this technology is curiously weak. Some argue that it will help us with medicine, and improve diagnostics, others dutifully remind us of the productivity gains that could be unleashed by deploying these technologies in the right way and some even suggest that there is a defensive aspect to the development of AI — if we do not develop it, it will lead to an international imbalance where the nations that have AI will be akin to those nations that have nuclear capabilities: technologically superior and capable of dictating the fates of those countries that lag behind (some of this language is emerging in the on-going geo-politicization of artificial intelligence between The US, Europe and China). Things were different in the early days of AI, back in the 1960s, and the idea of artificial intelligence was actually more connected then with the idea of a social and technical project, a project that was a distinct response to a set of challenges that seemed increasingly serious to writers of that age. Two very different examples support this observation: Stanislaw Lem and Herbert Simon. Simon, in attacking the challenge of information overload – or information wealth as he prefers to call it…

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